Jump to content

Is Sea-Sickness All In Our Heads?


Recommended Posts

I've just been chatting to some friends about cruising over lunch and the topic of sea-sickness came up. My friends wife suffers terribly with it, so much so that she was adamant she never wanted to go on another again after having a terrible first experience. We started talking about how to cope with it, whether it is something you cannot overcome or whether in fact it is all in our heads, and the more we think about it, the more it occurs.

 

What do you think? Is it all in our heads? What remedies to forum members recommend for helping cope with it? I've always been told the best medicine is alcohol...wacko.png  

Link to post
Share on other sites

I do not think sea-sickness is a state of mind, but I do think you can make it worse by worrying that the seas are rough.

I have found that on longer cruises ( I have done two World cruises on Aurora) it eases considerably as you learn to live with the motion. However in anything more than a force 8 I would always take Phenargen (often prescribed for vertigo) or Avomine as my nausea is a balance issue.

I have always been told that sea-sickness tablets are not a cure but preventative, so always take them before you feel ill.....

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am fortunate as I no longer suffer with sea-sickness. When I took my first cruise I did suffer and wound up having the injection to ease it. Since then I've always been fine.I do sometimes wonder whether it was more the idea of being sick that was playing on my mind with so many people bringing it up before we sailed that it was almost inevitable on board.

 

I took tablets before I sailed a few times. Like Gill57 I took Avomine on a few occasions before I travelled but now I don't bother anymore. My wife still struggles from time to time but even she is usually ok now.

 

I often see people with the travel bands on, do they really help?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting question starboard. I do think that sea-sickness is something that people genuinely do suffer with but I also think that worrying about it (which is understandable if you've had a rather bad case of seasickness) can often make it worse as you're constantly thinking about it. It's not something that I have ever suffered with, so don't have any personal remedies to share but happy to hear what others have to offer as my sister's other half suffers with seasickness pretty badly.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi   Seasickness is a real complaint and the person who suffers from it can reduce the symptoms if they wish but they often feel too "ill" to do so.   Standing the light and fixing their vision on the horizon does reduce the affects, but if you "feel" that you wish you were dead it's difficult to motivate yourself to do anything.  It's unlikely that this feeling is just a psychological event but there could be some influence on the severity, in Victorian times women often fainted but that's not the case now (tight corsets were a definitely a contributing factor) but social behaviour was important too.

Link to post
Share on other sites

My first cruise was with a party of school girls & we were fine until we neared the Bay of Biscay when we were told that due to the deep currents we would all feel ill. Lo & behold when we got there every one of us felt ill & had to sit on deck all morning. ( literally the deck - no sun beds for school kids). We flew home so the next time was 28years later & I took tablets just in case & they practically knocked me out! From then on I've had no problems & no tablets. Seasickness is a real condition & is awful if you suffer from it but I think that if you think you're going to be ill then you will be. Tablets do help but some make you very drowsy as I discovered.

Link to post
Share on other sites

When I first started cruising I was very bad with seasickness, even in relatively calm seas I was ill for first two days and in any rough sea after that.Eventually the sickness became less and I was only ill in rough-ish conditions.With the help of a sickness drug from our doctor and a pair of seabands I have not suffered for the last 2 years, It took 38 years of cruising to 'get my sealegs' but now it feels wonderful when the ship starts to rock and I can still get ready and go out for the night.

Link to post
Share on other sites

As a child I suffered terribly from motion sickness, cars, busses, a trip around Bridlington harbour, it was awful. So in the 90's when I went to Paris via a cross Chanel ferry and being told it was a force 9 I thought I was in big trouble. The journey was a nightmare, people couldn't stand or walk straight due to the extreme movement and literally people were being sick where they stood. As for me, well, I was eating duck a la orange in the restaurant ! Yet on a catamaran trip after two hours I started to feel queasy, I wasn't sick but I was glad to get off. I was also perfectly fine on our cruise to Norway. So I don't know why it effects some of us or why when you think you would be ill you're not.

GiGi

Link to post
Share on other sites

I do think that seasickness is real and not just psychological. I think we all have the potential to succumb to feeling a little queasy depending on the sea conditions. Some people are more prone to it than others but we cannot deny that it is an inner ear issue so therefore will undoubtedly effect us if triggered enough. I do however believe that we can make it worse by overthinking it. I agree that it's difficult not to overthink it when it takes hold but I think prior to cruising we can put the wheels in motion by taking motion sickness tablets before we go. I also think that the reason it is not consistent in the way it hits us is down to the distractions around us. If we are busy with our minds on other things it helps to overcome the feeling of nausea much more than when focused solely on it. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Some interesting opinions so far. As for remedies, I've heard of Avomine before on numerous occasions, but I've never really encountered other medications to help, are there many more to use? I've also heard that in the US many passengers are recommended to use patches on their arms or a small patch behind the ear that is a slow releasing anti-emetic. Not sure how I'd feel about that as apparently it can make you very dry-mouthed and drowsy, has anyone tried these before?

Link to post
Share on other sites

My brother took his girlfriend on her first cruise and she suffered so badly with seasickness, she couldn't move from the cabin for 2 days before she gave in and paid £70 for the injection from the medical centre on board. Within an hour she was right as rain - what is in the injection? It is a miracle formula!

Link to post
Share on other sites

It is in your head and also physical.

 

I really believe that some people can talk themselves into it, like the never ending questions and worries about the Bay of Biscay, similar to worries about flying or anything else that can cause stress. But also there are those that do get motion sickness and do not need stress to cause them to be ill.

 

So, in short, my view is that there is the same end result but two separate reasons for it.

 

RayO

Link to post
Share on other sites

Everybody can get seasick. My sister and my husband were two of a handful of people left standing when we hit a force 12 on Canberra. But along with the rest of us they were laid low in what appeared to be a moderate swell in the Bay of Biscay. We called the doctor as all 6 of us were suffering. He eventually arrived offering injections.My husband and sister were suffering the most as they had never been seasick before. The doctor told us it was as unusual swell pattern and all the medical staff were out giving injections, he estimated that 97% of people onboard were affected. They have never suffered since but it did make them more understanding of the rest of us that get seasick regularly.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone with seasickness has my deepest sympathy and is not in the mind. A episode of Coast on BBC (English Channel episode) discussed and demonstrated the reasons for seasickness which confirmed fluids within the inner ear area as the significant cause. And even Nelson from time to time experienced it. I am very lucky, more like no sense no feeling......as my wife says....but my thoughts to all of you who suffer from it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

My first cruise was with a party of school girls & we were fine until we neared the Bay of Biscay when we were told that due to the deep currents we would all feel ill. Lo & behold when we got there every one of us felt ill & had to sit on deck all morning. ( literally the deck - no sun beds for school kids). We flew home so the next time was 28years later & I took tablets just in case & they practically knocked me out! From then on I've had no problems & no tablets. Seasickness is a real condition & is awful if you suffer from it but I think that if you think you're going to be ill then you will be. Tablets do help but some make you very drowsy as I discovered.

MY first 'cruise' also was with 30 girls, when I took my Guides to Guernsey for Camp in 1954. It was rough but we had been allocated a large room with bunks right in the hold.  I spent 5 hours keeping them singing, so I did not have time to think of seasickness. My next crossing from Hull to Hamburg on a cargo ship in 1961, once out of the Humber I wanted to die but was OK sailing home. After that I took Sea Legs with me just in case, Now I never think about it and will be up to 62 cruises after this years 3 booked.     

Link to post
Share on other sites

I do believe that seasickness is a real illness and is not in the imagination.

It is caused by the brain being confused by the fact that the balance mechanism in the inner ear informs the brain that you are moving, but the eyes when focused on interior parts of the ship tells your brain that you're not.

This is why it is recommended that you go onto the open deck (weather permitting) and focus on the horizon.

Fortunately for my wife and I, we don't suffer from this problem.

I think you need to re-educate your brain to accept the fact that yes, it's a ship and it is moving. Once you can do this, the problem should disappear.

Link to post
Share on other sites

interesting subject, I was always travel sick, sick on a coach, car, train, ferry boats around the harbour you name it, but then I really wanted to cruise so much and knew I couldn't be ill for the duration. I wanted to cruise so much that I took the plunge and I have never been sick since.  so for me I guess it was something in the head but I yes people do have problems with the balances in the ear which will also cause sea sickness.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...