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Why are new ships getting larger? Princess Majestic


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I've just been reading up on the new Majestic Princess which looks amazing however my travelling companions don't like the large ships. We hold our breath when another new ship is announced however the ships are just getting larger and larger with more & more people.  Yes we have found smaller ships but they are always in the 5/6 star category & as we like to try and do a couple of cruises each year this I'm afraid is not an option for us. I wonder if any cruise operators have a 4 star product they are bringing out in the future?

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They may be able to get into most ports because of shallow draughts but it does not mean the pors can cope. How often have we seen threads relating to delays getting on and off ships. What is the effect on smaller ports where the local population becomes out of balance? With more and decks, above the waterline, will the ships become less stable in bad weather due to thevsame shallow draughts?

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I've just been reading up on the new Majestic Princess which looks amazing however my travelling companions don't like the large ships. We hold our breath when another new ship is announced however the ships are just getting larger and larger with more & more people.  Yes we have found smaller ships but they are always in the 5/6 star category & as we like to try and do a couple of cruises each year this I'm afraid is not an option for us. I wonder if any cruise operators have a 4 star product they are bringing out in the future?

Actually you can still cruise Cunard, Princess, Holland America , Disney , MCL and some of the European and some sailing ships with passengers size of 600 - 2,600 to name a few , These ships might be older as in 10 years or more but large and comfortable in size enjoyment , Just pick a destination then check out the ships and size of passenger and free space ratio

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Guest Solent Richard

Because they are cheaper to operate, offer more facilities, appeal to new and younger cruisers and because of their shallow draughts can still get into most ports.

 

They certainly appear to appeal to new and younger cruisers - and some older ones on a cost basis - but frankly leave me cold .

 

Having been underwhelmed when I did a 16 nighter on Independence of the Seas I would hazard a guess that P&O's Britannia and Cunard's Queen Mary 2 is about the limit for me...

 

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At the other end of the scale I have booked a cruise next year on a ship that has just 34 staterooms and two suites

 

Sounds cool to me.

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To answer the question on stability. No they will not become more unstable due to electronically controlled ballast. If you look at the very large ships they are wider rather than higher. As for the ports I have yet to visit a port that cannot cope as the cruise lines usually check this before selecting them.

As for queuing as shown above I have photos like that but in connection with much smaller ships.

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I've just been reading up on the new Majestic Princess which looks amazing however my travelling companions don't like the large ships. We hold our breath when another new ship is announced however the ships are just getting larger and larger with more & more people.  Yes we have found smaller ships but they are always in the 5/6 star category & as we like to try and do a couple of cruises each year this I'm afraid is not an option for us. I wonder if any cruise operators have a 4 star product they are bringing out in the future?

Fred Olsen ?

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They may be able to get into most ports because of shallow draughts but it does not mean the pors can cope. How often have we seen threads relating to delays getting on and off ships. What is the effect on smaller ports where the local population becomes out of balance? With more and decks, above the waterline, will the ships become less stable in bad weather due to thevsame shallow draughts?

Some strong points here, and the shallow draught issue is a big subject that has yet to reach a denouement.

Regarding the impact on ports the shore spend per person on larger ships is lower than on smaller, due to overloading of port facilities and restaurants, so we can expect ports that have invested such as Madeira to be differentiating financially between the larger and smaller ships..

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To answer the question on stability. No they will not become more unstable due to electronically controlled ballast. If you look at the very large ships they are wider rather than higher. As for the ports I have yet to visit a port that cannot cope as the cruise lines usually check this before selecting them.

As for queuing as shown above I have photos like that but in connection with much smaller ships.

They are already unstable in comparison to conventionally designed ships, however that difference in stability only becomes a real safety issue in a loss of power situation.

Where has the "electronically controlled ballast" idea come from, do you have a link?

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They are already unstable in comparison to conventionally designed ships, however that difference in stability only becomes a real safety issue in a loss of power situation.

Where has the "electronically controlled ballast" idea come from, do you have a link?

 

It is something that has been in being for some years. It is where the ballast, usually water is moved around various compartments in the keel/hull to aid stability. I will try and find a link.

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Hi Wheels 36

I have found a good item on Wikipedia but am still learning how to cut and paste links from one site to another on my Apple computer that I only received yesterday. Type in Cruise ship ballast and it brings up a variety of articles as well as diagrams. From what I have read the water is taken into the tanks that are operated by valves enabling the water to be electronically moved about from tank to tank to aid stability. 

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Hi   The increase in the size of cruise ships has been a common factor for many years and I can't see the large corporations who dominate the cruise segment altering their policies.  The ships are cheaper to operate per passengers and they do offer a much cheaper product than those of us who can remember the costs some thirty years ago.  These ships offer many facilities and alternative dining venues (many at additional cost) and have encouraged many tourists who wouldn't have considered to take a cruise to take the plunge and try an ocean voyage.  However, the rise in the number of river ships over the last few years shows that not all passengers want the extra facilities offered on these large cruise ships and are still interested in the itinerary and wish to explore new sites rather than try the latest flow rider etc.  I hope that niche cruise lines such as Voyages of Discovery, Fred Olsen, Saga and the smaller premium/luxury market continue to operate successfully and offer the potential cruise passengers an alternative to the impersonal service offered by the large cruise ships.

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Hello, I can understand that the companies want to build these larger ships. But what always baffles me is timetables. I think I mentioned it once before a long time ago. You look at the Webcams or port timetables, well you do if like me you are a bit sad, and there will be several ships docked on a given day.Then none for a day or so followed by numbers again. Why ?.

Rodger.

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Good point Land Ahoy, there will always be a market for the smaller ships, with bespoke destinations that the larger ships cant get near to or the locations not having the capacity to cope with the larger vessels. I personally do like the smaller or mid size ships and for location alone am happy to sacrifice some of the facilities for the destination. I think there is a market for both and it depends on the type of holiday you want and dare I say which age group of travellers you wish to be with.

It could also be said that the smaller more intimate sized vessels offer a very different level of service which again some will appreciate whilst others may want more things to do over an enhanced level of service. DEFINITELY ROOM FOR BOTH

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Hi Wheels 36

I have found a good item on Wikipedia but am still learning how to cut and paste links from one site to another on my Apple computer that I only received yesterday. Type in Cruise ship ballast and it brings up a variety of articles as well as diagrams. From what I have read the water is taken into the tanks that are operated by valves enabling the water to be electronically moved about from tank to tank to aid stability. 

Hi OWT,

I think that this tank transfer is compensation for the flat bottom, as opposed to the conventional deep keel where a substantial amount of ballast was always below the water line. However, I think that the primary stability issue is the height of the ship and the enormous overturning forces that can be generated in a high wind, forces so large that they can only be counterbalanced by the weight of the ship at an appropriate moment.

This counterbalancing moment is the real problem as it means increasing the width of the ship, which of course is not desirable at it restricts where the ship can go.

I do not know what wind forces new cruise ships are currently designed for but I would hazard a guess that it is well below hurricane level, leaving the captain to manage huge winds by positioning the ship non axial to the wind direction.

This of course means that the ship having power to position relative to the wind is critical with regards to the safety of these mega ships.

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Thank you I appreciate all your replies. We do like the smaller ships, the Queen Victoria/Elizabeth being about the largest we'd do as we have tried larger ships and although you do have more facilities, dining venue's etc.. we feel they're just not for us. The Oceania, Regent brands look so appealing but so far have just proved to be a little too expensive.

I've always enjoyed our cruises so am sure we'll get sorted!!!

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Thank you I appreciate all your replies. We do like the smaller ships, the Queen Victoria/Elizabeth being about the largest we'd do as we have tried larger ships and although you do have more facilities, dining venue's etc.. we feel they're just not for us. The Oceania, Regent brands look so appealing but so far have just proved to be a little too expensive.

I've always enjoyed our cruises so am sure we'll get sorted!!!

A lot of the upscale lines have  specials during the year or offer free air et cetra

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Because they are cheaper to operate, offer more facilities, appeal to new and younger cruisers and because of their shallow draughts can still get into most ports.

 Big ships might have shallow draughts, but two of the latest Princess ships, Royal and Regal Princess are too large to enter the Stockholm harbour  Consequently, they have to anchor miles away, followed by a two-hour journey into the city!  But then, perhaps Princess Cruises don't consider Stockholm to be a major port. Furthermore, their itineraries have become depressingly similar, because they cannot visit many very interesting places.  Big is not always better, particularly for those of us who regard cruising as an excellent way of seeing the world.

 

Consequently, there is still demand for smaller ships, which are able to offer more varied itineraries.  Furthermore, some of the so-called six-star cruise lines are not always prohibitively expensive, when you consider what is included in the fare.  For instance, Regent includes all gratuities and does not charge for alcoholic or non-alcoholic drinks, specialty teas and coffees, specialty restaurants, shuttle buses (where required) and a range of free shore excursions in every port.  These "extras" can add up very quickly on cruise ships that cater for the mass market.

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Cruised on Royal PRINCESS in july -  not at all passenger friendly compared with earlier Princess vessels.  No enclosed forward deck -  library so small only room for a table and a dozen passengers (over 3000 on board) - atrium not as impressive or useful as others. We felt it was designed solely as a money making machine - we will not use ROYAL PRINCESS  again

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