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Cabin size reduction will increase passenger capacity on ships with a positive effect on prices, but risks losing customers (see negative forum input on Britannia cabin sizes).

However, the real issue for cruise lines is that if they make cabins too spacious and comfortable they may well have a happy customer, but also one who has spent too much time in their cabin and not enough time spending in shops, bars, and casinos.

Are we sympathetic as to their predicament?

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Hi  Each of us have different opinions on the type of cabin we prefer (inside to grand suites) and most cruise lines try to satisfy most passengers.  On a personal level I would much prefer to have the cheapest cabin on a six star cruise line than a large suite on a mainstream cruise ship.  Others would disagree and as it's their money I have no issues with their views.  If a passenger books a small cabin (dimensions are included in the brochure and the cruise lines websites) whose fault is it  (so why do they complain), if they wish to have larger accommodation they should have booked the appropriate grade and if a particular ship does not meet their requirements many others will.

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I have to say that the size of the cabin certainly has no influence on my spending habits on board. It depends on the type of things they sell and whether or not I consider it to be worth buying. Most of the time, unless it is perfume, then I would say not and as I tend to price things up before I leave the UK it can sometimes be found that some items are cheaper to buy at home anyway.

 

On the other hand whilst cabin sizes do appear to be getting smaller, even though I probably do only do the normal things in it, I do want one bigger than that which you cannot swing the preverbal cat in.

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Cruise lines will give passengers what they want.

I often read that somebody will not cruise unless they have a balcony, so now we have lots of balconies when only a few years ago we had few or none. I have never read anybody stating a minimum cabin size.

I have always taken the view that if my cabin is my favourite part of the ship then I'm on the wrong ship. I can't really imagine cabin size affects passengers' desires to spend time in them.

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Am I sympathetic to their predicament? In a word, No. How can you feel sorry for cruise lines that according to their annual returns and stock market ratings are making lots of money.

On the question of cabin choice many people decide according to itinerary. Lots of sea days, have a balcony. Port hopping, have an inside.

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As most people claim they prefer mid sized ships th eonly way to increase capacity is to make cabins smaller, personally having spent a few days in a shoe box or on a balcony where I could touch all 4 sides this does seem pointless and not great for a salesperson to sell to as customer.

On the flip side looking at some of the balconies which have been created on the larger ships like Allure of the seas its like having a lounger on your own back garden.

Is it just greed and the need to satisfy shareholders, maybe as that happens in all other walks of life!!

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I think cruise lines are giving people what they want.  I've never sailed in a cabin I thought was too small, but I don't spend a great deal of time in the cabin (though more than some do).  As some people literally change clothes and sleep in their cabin, spending the rest of the time in lounges and on shore, they'd rather have the lower fare and a smaller cabin.  Fine!  In addition to the smallest inside cabin, cruise lines also offer larger balcony cabins, mini-suites, and full suites.  You pay your money, you take your choice!

 

As someone else commented, they always publish the dimensions and with the exception of an inaugural sailing on a new ship it's trivial to find reviews with photographs showing exactly what cabins will be like.  There really should be no surprises!

 

As most people claim they prefer mid sized ships th eonly way to increase capacity is to make cabins smaller.

 

From what I hear about why people prefer smaller ships, having more people on board would not be welcome.  It's not the size of the ship, but the fact that a small ship means fewer passengers meaning more space and more personalised service.  Cramming more people into the same size of ship would go against that.

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