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I've read a few magazine where they've featured and they always use cuisine as a selling point.  The restaurants do look lovely though, in particular Red Ginger which always seems to get rave reviews.  I've never cruised with them but I would love to.  They always look quite good value for money actually considering the reviews and reputation they have.  

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Hi I have used a search engine and it's an impossible question to answer accurately cruise lines keep this informatiom secret.  However, here's somebody's estimates from 2009 and Oceania are close to the top;

 

 

The numbers you are looking for are very carefully guarded secrets in the cruise industry. The cruise lines are even reluctant to give them to each other.

The numbers do vary quite a bit as well, depending on ship, itinerary, and time of year.

Here is a general break-down, per passenger, per day:

Seabourn, Silver Sea - $24 - 26 per day
Oceania, Regent - $18 - 20 per day
Celebrity, Princess - $12 - 15 per day
RCCL, HAL - $12 - 13 per day
Carnival - $8 - 10 per day
NCL - $7.50 - 8.50 per day

Bear in mind that itinerary has a lot to do with these numbers:

Flying tons of food from USA to a ship in Europe is very expensive.
European Cruisers have paid substantially more for a cruise and have higher expectations. Their menus are usually pricier.

Caribbean Cruisers generally pay far less for a cruise. Their expectations are generally lower, so menus carry less expensive items. Loading food in the Caribbean is usually far less expensive as well.

Alaska Cruises are generally pricier, people eat more there and spend more time in the restaurants. Shipping and loading are more expensive in Alaska. Menus are generally higher cost on these itineraries.

Transatlantic cruisers eat far more than those on a "regular" cruise. This pushes costs about 50% higher.

Cruises with more sea days have far higher food costs than cruises that are port-intensive. It seems that when cruisers are not going ashore, they are eating, eating, eating.

Most passengers gorge themselves for the first 3 or 4 days of their cruise. When they finally realise that they are eating themselves sick, they back off a bit and eat more normally. As a result, food costs on a 3 or 4 day cruise are far higher than on longer cruises.

Repositioning cruises usually attract the bargain hunters. The mass market cruise lines just wants to break even on fuel costs to get the ship from the old itinerary to the new one. Most of the higher priced items disappear from these menus to cut costs.

By the way, there will be a percentage of readers on this board who will say that these numbers are impossible. Next time you want to complain about food quality on a ship, think about how they are able to sell you such a low priced vacation..................
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"Caribbean cruisers generally pay far less for a cruise. Their expectation are generally lower, so the menus carry less expensive items."

 

Sorry Land Ahoy that is total rubbish and pretty insulting. I prefer the Caribbean to other places but I can assure you my expectations are as high as yours and I don't pay a cheap price either. So what items do you think the Caribbean passengers don't get?

 

Could it be that food prices are kept down due to the ships being larger so food can be bought in larger bulk? I would think that more likely than my expectations being lower ;) 

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"Caribbean cruisers generally pay far less for a cruise. Their expectation are generally lower, so the menus carry less expensive items."

 

Sorry Land Ahoy that is total rubbish and pretty insulting. I prefer the Caribbean to other places but I can assure you my expectations are as high as yours and I don't pay a cheap price either. So what items do you think the Caribbean passengers don't get?

 

Could it be that food prices are kept down due to the ships being larger so food can be bought in larger bulk? I would think that more likely than my expectations being lower ;)

 HI Jaczs

I did not write the article I copied and pasted it from a cruise blogger,I don't vouch for it's accuracy.  But from my own cruise experience the quality of food served on the "luxury" lines is of a much higher standard than that on the less expensive ones and so I do feel it does reflect, at least in part, the cost of the food mentioned in the article.

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Guest shilly3191

 HI Jaczs

I did not write the article I copied and pasted it from a cruise blogger,I don't vouch for it's accuracy.  But from my own cruise experience the quality of food served on the "luxury" lines is of a much higher standard than that on the less expensive ones and so I do feel it does reflect, at least in part, the cost of the food mentioned in the article.

I think most people will think that is common sense as the saying goes "you get what you pay for" I would certainly expect and would be very annoyed if after paying the cruise price that Seabourn, Silversea, Crystal and others charge that they were no better than Thomsons, P&O, Costa or MSC.

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"You get what you pay for"

 

That can be true with a lot of things but not necessarily on food quality. We all know from when we shop that the bigger the bulk buy the cheaper the cost, take Sainsbury's verses Waitrose people think the food quality must be better at Waitrose and yes in some products it is, Waitrose has its own farms and will only use sustainable fish sources so the quality is better but what about the items that are identical in Sainsbury's yet cost a few pence more are they better? We all know the answer is no. You pay a lot of the extra in Waitrose for the quality of service not food.

So it goes without saying if you have a ship of 750 passengers v a ship of 4000 passengers the larger ship will be buying larger bulk and therefore will have the cheaper price so the same quality of food can be put on both ships but you would expect the service to be better on a smaller ship.

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"You get what you pay for"

 

That can be true with a lot of things but not necessarily on food quality. We all know from when we shop that the bigger the bulk buy the cheaper the cost, take Sainsbury's verses Waitrose people think the food quality must be better at Waitrose and yes in some products it is, Waitrose has its own farms and will only use sustainable fish sources so the quality is better but what about the items that are identical in Sainsbury's yet cost a few pence more are they better? We all know the answer is no. You pay a lot of the extra in Waitrose for the quality of service not food.

So it goes without saying if you have a ship of 750 passengers v a ship of 4000 passengers the larger ship will be buying larger bulk and therefore will have the cheaper price so the same quality of food can be put on both ships but you would expect the service to be better on a smaller ship.

 Hi  It's not only the cost of the food ingredients it's the ability of the galley to produce excellent food.  This is where small ships (6 star) score over their cheaper competitors they employ more people to prepare and cook the dishes. 

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